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    If an audio unit with theft protection is disconnected from electrical power, it will be disabled until a unique code is entered into the audio unit. This unique code is listed on the anti-theft ID card that comes with the vehicle.

    If you don’t have the anti-theft ID card, you’ll need to enter your audio unit serial number into the Radio & Navigation System microsite, in order to retrieve your unique code. Refer to your owner’s manual for instructions on how to get the audio unit serial number electronically from your radio.

    Most older vehicles (model year 2003 and older) will require a visit to the dealer to retrieve the audio unit serial number and radio code.

    For more information, go to the Radio & Navigation System microsite link.

    Depending on the model year of the vehicle, it is typically between 60,000 and 90,000 miles. If your vehicle has a timing chain instead of a timing belt, replacement of the timing chain is not required. Refer to the Scheduled Maintenance section of the appropriate owner's manual for specific information.

    There are many variables that determine how often an oil change is needed (climate, drive time, highway or city street driving, etc.). You should follow the guidance provided by your vehicle’s Maintenance Minder system (if equipped) or refer to the Scheduled Maintenance section in the appropriate owner's manual for specific information.

    For information about Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink (HFL), such as checking phone compatibility, how to pair a phone, or importing an address book, please visit the Honda Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink® site or call (888) 528-7876.

    For vehicles equipped with the Battery Management System, this message occurs when the battery’s State of Charge has dropped below a predetermined level. The message is intended to inform you that the battery requires charging to guarantee proper performance under all conditions (extremely cold conditions, high electrical system demands, etc). Conditions that may cause the battery charge to drop enough to prompt the BATTERY CHARGE LOW or BATT LOW message are:

    • Extended time spent with the ignition on, but the engine not running. The effect on the battery is made worse if the radio, lights, heater fan or other accessories are on at the same time.
    • Driving short trips repeatedly without a longer trip between them. The starter uses a lot of energy when starting the engine. If the engine is not run long enough, the charging system cannot recharge the battery to the level it was at before the engine was started. Running high-demand electrical accessories, such as seat heaters, can make this situation even worse.
    • Extremely cold weather is also hard on the battery. Not only does it require more energy to start the vehicle in the cold, but the battery just doesn’t work as well.

    If any of these conditions occur, and the battery charge drops below a certain level, the battery management system informs the driver that the battery may not be able to start the vehicle in extreme cases by illuminating the BATTERY CHARGE LOW or BATT LOW warning message. While this message does mean the battery charge is low, it usually does not mean that the battery won’t start the engine. If you see the BATTERY CHARGE LOW or BATT LOW message, don’t panic. It simply means the battery charge is lower than it should be. This can be fixed by taking longer trips between shorter trips, minimizing unnecessary electrical accessory usage during short trips, and spending less time using electrical accessories while the engine is not running. The battery management system is intended to protect the driver from allowing the battery charge to drop to a point where it cannot start the vehicle. By using it as a guide, not only will the life of the battery be extended, but the chances of the vehicle not starting due to a discharged battery will be greatly reduced.

    The Vehicle Identification Number, commonly referred to as the VIN, is a sequence of 17 letters and numbers that is uniquely assigned for each vehicle. The VIN can usually be found on the driver's side dashboard near or under the bottom portion of the windshield. It can also be found in various other places on the vehicle, including the certification label found on the driver's doorjamb.
    The VIN provides some information about the vehicle. It is typically composed of four sections. The first three digits are called the World Manufacturer Identifier (WMI). This identifies where the vehicle was manufactured or assembled and the type of vehicle it is. Honda has factories in Japan, Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Each factory has its own identifying code. For example, a VIN starting with 1HG identifies a passenger vehicle manufactured at Honda of America, while 2HG identifies a passenger vehicle manufactured at Honda of Canada. Honda currently has 10 different manufacturing locations.
    The next five digits (4 through 8) are the Vehicle Description Section (VDS). These digits provide information on the engine type, body style, and vehicle model type. The ninth digit is a check digit used internally. The 10th digit indicates the model year; letters (except "O" and "Z") were used for vehicles up to the 2000 model year while numbers are used for 2001 and newer vehicles. For example, "X" means the 1999 model year, "Y" is the 2000 model year and "1" represents the 2001 model year. The 11th digit is the plant code. Finally, digits 12 - 17 are the serial number, which is unique to each vehicle.